VITAL


VITAL
VITAL, Italian family which produced numerous scholars of whom the most noted were: JOSEPH VITAL (15th–16th century), a talented scribe, was especially noted for his precision in writing tefillin, which were widely known as Tefillin Rav Calabrash (Tefillin of the Rabbi of Calabria from where his family stemmed). His tefillin were highly praised by menahem azariah da fano (Resp. no. 38). He was the father of the celebrated kabbalist Ḥayyim Vital . MOSES BEN JOSEPH VITAL (d. middle of the 17th century), younger brother of Ḥayyim Vital, was rabbi in Safed. Like his brother, he was an enthusiastic kabbalist and many legends enveloped his life; some, in fact, actually related to his brother. Other legendary accounts assigned to him a central role for seeing to it that Rabbi Isaac Luria's legacy was saved for posterity. After his brother's death, he assumed a more important role in the kabbalistic community of Safed. Legendary material on his life is to be found in Ma'aseh Nissim shel ha-Am by Naphtali Herz Bachrach. MOSES VITAL, son of Samuel b. Ḥayyim Vital , was a rabbi in Egypt from the second half of the 17th until the beginning of the 18th century. He was a penetrating halakhist and brilliant kabbalist. All that remains of his published work is one responsum, included in abraham b. mordecai ha-Levi's Ginnat Veradim. -BIBLIOGRAPHY: Conforte, Kore, 40b; M. Benayahu, Sefer Toledot ha-Ari (1967), index. (Guiseppe Laras)

Encyclopedia Judaica. 1971.

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  • vital — vital …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • vital — vital …   Deutsch Wörterbuch

  • vital — vital, ale, aux [ vital, o ] adj. • 1380; lat. vitalis, de vita « vie » 1 ♦ Qui concerne, constitue la vie. Cycle vital. Propriétés, fonctions vitales. Les besoins vitaux de l individu. ♢ Philos. Principe vital, force vitale : réalité énergétique …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Vital — Vi tal, a. [F., fr. L. vitalis, fr. vita life; akin to vivere to live. See {Vivid}.] 1. Belonging or relating to life, either animal or vegetable; as, vital energies; vital functions; vital actions. [1913 Webster] 2. Contributing to life;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Vital — may refer to:* vitalism, the doctrine that life cannot be explained solely by mechanism * vitalism (Jainism), the Jain teacher Mahāvīra s philosophy * Vital, the English name of a number of Roman Catholic saints named Vitalis in Latin * Vitals ,… …   Wikipedia

  • Vital — (lebenskräftig, lebenswichtig, munter) steht für Männlicher Vorname. Bekannte Namensträger: Joseph Vital Kopp, Schweizer Theologe und Schriftsteller (1906–1966) Vital Borkelmans, Fußballspieler (* 1963) Vital Julian Frey, Schweizer Cembalist (*… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • vital — VITÁL, Ă, vitali, e, adj. 1. Care este caracteristic sau esenţial pentru viaţă, în care rezidă viaţa; de viaţă, al vieţii. 2. Foarte important, fundamental, esenţial, de bază; indispensabil. – Din fr. vital, lat. vitalis. Trimis de ana zecheru,… …   Dicționar Român

  • vital — [vīt′ l] adj. [ME < MFr < L vitalis, vital < vita, life, akin to vivere, to live: see BIO ] 1. of, concerned with, or manifesting life [vital energy] 2. a) necessary or essential to life; being a source or support of life [vital organs]… …   English World dictionary

  • vital — vital, ale (vi tal, ta l ) adj. 1°   Qui appartient à la vie, qui sert à la conservation de la vie. •   Les physiologistes ont prouvé que les mouvements vitaux sont le produit des impressions reçues par les parties sensibles, CABANIS Instit. Mém …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • vital — Adj kräftig, lebendig erw. fremd. Erkennbar fremd (19. Jh.) Entlehnung. Entlehnt aus frz. vital, dieses aus l. vītālis Lebenskraft habend , zu l. vīta Leben , zu l. vīvere leben . Abstraktum: Vitalität.    Ebenso nndl. vital, ne. vital, nfrz.… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache